matter, how dense are you?

oct. 22-26

goals

Calculate density to identify an unknown substance

warm up: (engaging activities to set up class time)

Monday- Density is calculated by dividing the mass of a substance by its –

  • volume
  • weight
  • temperature
  • length

Tuesday, The density of water is 1 g/cm³.  A substance will float if its density is less than that of water.  Which of the following substances will float? What’s the density of the substance that will float?

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday:  none

activity: (what we do in class)

Monday: After the warm up and introducing our new unit, How Dense is It? We went over Friday’s summative, It’s Classified: elements, compounds, metals and more. The deadline for retaking the summative is Monday, Nov. 5th. My reteach day is Tuesday, 30th after school. Retakes can be made Weds.-Mon. during lunch, after school on Weds. or Fri., or during advisory on Thur. or Fri.  

Tuesday, students watched a BrainPop, learning from Tim and Moby what density is and how to calculate it. Afterwards, they were given a Fill in the Blanks Notes for finding Density. They glued them into their notebooks for reference.

Wednesday- Thursday  Students were given several cubes made of various substances. They worked as a team to find these physical properties of the cubes: mass, volume and density. They recorded their findings in their notebooks. Finally, they were given a table of substances that were used to make each cube and it’s density. Using their data and the table, they were able to identify the cube’s substance. 

Friday, students continued to build their knowledge of calculating density using irregular shapes. They watched this fun Ted Talk, How Taking a Bath Led to Archimedes’ Principle. Afterwards, they were given some irregular shapes and time to find their densities. They’re recording their discoveries in their notebooks. They’ll finish this up on Monday, 5th. 

homework:

none

it’s classified: metals, nonmetals and metalloids

Oct. 22-26

goals:

  • know that an element is a pure substance represented by a chemical symbol and that a compound is a pure substance represented by a chemical formula
  • recognize that a limited number of many known elements comprise the largest portion of the solid Earth, living matter, oceans, and the atmosphere
  • compare metals, nonmetals, and metalloids using physical properties such as luster, conductivity, or malleability

warm up

Monday: Make a Venn Diagram with 3 circles, labeling the circles of metal, non-metal and metalloid. Compare them. 

Tuesday: What are the common elements found in our atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere? Hint: use your circle graphs with titles

Wednesday:

Thursday

Friday:

in class…

Monday: Students used the Properties of Matter Quizlet Live to prepare for the DCA tomorrow. 

Tuesday: Students took their Properties of Matter DCA today. We’ll go over them tomorrow. If they failed it, but earn a grade of a 70% or better on Friday’s summative, then their DCA, a formative, will be bumped up to a 70. 

Wednesday: Students went over their DCAs with the hopes of learning from their mistakes. Afterwards, we explored some samples of elements, exploring these physical properties: luster, conductivity and malleability. The write up with conclusion questions will be due Monday, 29th. This will be formative grade. 

Thursday: We discussed yesterday’s lab and then had fun reviewing for tomorrow’s summative of Properties of Matter using Quizziz Live.

Friday: students took their summative of Properties of Matter today.

homework:

  • Metals, Non-metals and Metalloids lab (Formative) due Monday, 29th

Matter Just Keeps Compounding!

Oct. 10-12

Deadline for retaking Taxonomy Summative is Thursday, 11

  • Retaking Summative: Weds. 10th or Thurs. 11th after school
  • If after school is IMPOSSIBLE for you, talk to Mr. Rozsa about other options

goals:

  • know that an element is a pure substance represented by a chemical symbol and that a compound is a pure substance represented by a chemical formula
  • recognize that a limited number of many known elements comprise the largest portion of the solid Earth, living matter, oceans, and the atmosphere

warm ups:

Monday & Tuesday, no school

Wednesday, click on this link, elements vs compounds

Thursday, used a handout from Friday, 5th, doing the last 8. Click on this PDF of Elements, Compounds & more. Each set of drawings represent an element, compoud or mixture of these. Using your knowledge of these words, label boxes A-H using the following: E- element; C- compound; M.E.- mixture of elements; M.C.- mixture of compounds and/or M.E.C.- mixture of elements and compounds

in class we on

Wednesday, students cut out their pie graphs of the % of elements that make up the 4 parts of Earth and glued them into their notebooks. See the picture below.  Students were given their rubric for their project which can be found on Google Classroom. On this site, students can check out my Cool Science page and use some of the links to Periodic Tables of Elements. This project will be weighted as a summative, due Friday, Oct. 19th. 

To help students remember the elements that make up most of Earth, I came up with titles for each part:

  • atmosphere- NO air pollution, Nitrogen and Oxygen which make up 99% of our air
  • biosphere- SPONCH CaFe, cafes serve food that was once living. Therefore, these chemical symbols are what make up all living matter. 
  • hydrosphere- H2O, formula for water
  • lithosphere- Litho means solid rock or Earth’s crust. To eat the best crust on the planet, go to SiAlO CaFe which are the chemical symbols that make up Earth’s crust.

Thursday, students continued to build their knowledge of elements and compounds through the warm up and today’s activity, Nuts and Bolts. In this activity, students worked with their shoulder buddy and looked at 9 different baggies that contained nuts, bolts and or washers. They were to draw the contents of the baggies and then identify it as a representation of either an element, compound, mixture of elements, mixture of compounds or a mixture of elements & compounds. If the partners finished early, they could share their findings with others and have a discussion over different answers. 

Friday, students were given time to complete their Nuts and Bolts.

homework:

Elemon Cards Project, summative grade, due Friday, Oct. 19th

It’s Elemental, Dr. Watson, Elemental!

Oct. 1-5

Deadline for retaking Taxonomy Summative is Thursday, 11

  • Reteach Tuesday, 2nd and Friday, 5th, or Weds. 10th after school
  • Retaking Summative: Friday 5th, Weds. 10th or Thurs. 11th after school
  • If after school is IMPOSSIBLE for you, talk to Mr. Rozsa about other options

goals:

  • know that an element is a pure substance represented by a chemical symbol and that a compound is a pure substance represented by a chemical formula
  • recognize that a limited number of many known elements comprise the largest portion of the solid Earth, living matter, oceans, and the atmosphere

warm ups:

Monday, none due to testing

Tuesday, What characteristics would you expect the mushroom to have?

  • multicellular, eukaryotic cells, autotrophic, asexual
  • unicellular, eukaryotic cells, heterotrophic, sexual
  • multicellular, prokaryotic cells, autotrophic, asexual
  • multicellular, eukaryotic cells, heterotrophic, sexual

Wednesday

  • Name the elements found in Aspirin, C9H8O4
  • Is this an example of a chemical symbol or chemical formula?

Thursday, write down what each of these abbreviations mean:

  • OMG 
  • NM
  • LOL
  • BC
  • IDK
  • TTYL
  • BTW
  • IYKWIM

Friday, Click on this PDF of Elements, Compounds & more. Each set of drawings represent an element, compoud or mixture of these. Using your knowledge of these words, label boxes A-H using the following: E- element; C- compound; M.E.- mixture of elements; M.C.- mixture of compounds and/or M.E.C.- mixture of elements and compounds

in class we on 

Monday, students took their Taxonomy Summative.

Tuesday, students learned about their performance on yesterday’s summative as we went over them. We then were introduced to our new unit through this fun video, Meet the Elements. Students created a graffiti page while watching it. 

Wednesday, students were given time to write their GKWs #1 in their notebooks in preparation for Friday’s quiz. It’ll be an open notebook quiz. 

Thursday, students learned and wrote in our notebooks about how elements and compounds are similar and different using this PDF, elements vs compounds vs mixtures. We didn’t discuss mixtures. Here’s a picture of elements versus compounds notebook page. from the above PDF.

Friday, students completed the warm up and then I shared with them a sports metaphor to help them understand our 2nd goal, recognize that a limited number of many known elements comprise the largest portion of the solid Earth, living matter, oceans, and the atmosphere. Afterwards, they moved about the room, discovering the elements that make up the most parts of Earth’s atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Then they took their open notebook quiz over the GKWs. Finally, I gave them their homework, 4 pie graphs showing the elements that make up most of our planet, circle graph of elements in atmosphere and hydrosphere  and circle graph of elements in bioshpere and lithosphere Below is a picture of my notebook page called Earth’s Varsity Elements, that students ought to have in theirs. 

Earth’s Varsity Elements

homework:

Complete the pie graphs for the 4 parts of Earth by Weds., 10th